Would I drink Omission Beer?

I have.  It is outstanding.  I received a sample of it when I was Director of Marketing at Gluten-Free Publishing.  I am not a person who knows when they have been “glutened” so I did not have any sort of reaction and it really did taste good.

I would NOT drink it again right now.  Until it is determined to be gluten-free, not just safe for celiacs, I will stick with the sorghum beers and ciders.  In all reality, I cannot believe that CSA took this position.  They have been the most outrageous celiac organization over the years with their positions on oats and vinegar and now they say this beer is ok?

From the articles I have read, the testing they are using is not a good test for this product.  If experts like Dr. Alessio Fasano are saying that the test CSA is using is not the most accurate test for this product, then Dr. Fasano is the scientist I will trust.

My prediction is that the backlash over this will be fierce, much like the Domino’s pizza crust and the Amber rating from NFCA.  In hindsight, the pizza crust was determined not to be safe for celiacs and much of the criticism was centered around who Domino’s was trying to attract with their gluten-free crust.  At least it was upfront about the cross contamination problems and warned the celiac population.

Have you noticed the silence on the issue from other entities that certify foods as gluten-free?  That, to me, is extremely telling.  I think they understand that the test is not valid and will not risk their reputations until the TTB and the FDA are on the same page.

Omission beer might be tasty, it might eventually be determined to be gluten free but saying something is “safe for celiacs” without a really sophisticated and accurate test to back up that claim is totally irresponsible in my opinion.

Kendall Egan

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FINALLY…an FDA definition of “gluten free”

First off, big thanks to Amy Ratner, the editor of Gluten-Free Living magazine for following this FDA decision for five or six years and reporting on the slow pace of progress to get to this moment.  Here is her blog about the decision: http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/2013/08/02/gluten-free-labeling-rules-finally-approved/

What does this mean to me?  I am excited because a lot of food will now be labeled.  Vendors with a gluten-free product might not have labeled it as such because there was no definition of gluten free.  Now they have a definitive basis to test the product in order to decide that the product is or is not gluten-free based upon a real definition.

I am so glad the FDA stuck to the 20 ppm since that seems to be the acceptable definition elsewhere.  Glad there was time for public comment and sane discussion.

The really good news is that this decision is finally DONE for those of us who have celiac disease and while incredibly delayed in coming, this is the culmination of a lot of effort from people who really, really just want food choices that are safe.

Wonder if it will take this long to get GMO labeling done….

Kendall Egan